Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

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Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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This post was updated on .
 Note:  This El Universal bombshell article drew no interest in the world press... I have just written an article about the killing of innocents and have addressed this article.  In El Sicario, Molloy and Bowden speak about it in their intro....Paz, Chivis


“SOCIAL CLEANSING NOT DRUGWAR” Chivis Martinez for Borderland Beat

Traces of Paramilitary:  Legislators contend the State permits the existence of death squads
Investigation: Due to massive numbers of executions, the Senate of the Republic asks CISEN for reports on the existence of death squads.

Ignacio Alvarado Álvarez
El Universal
Monday October 18, 2010

In September, the Senate formally requested detailed reports from CISEN (Center for Investigation and National Security) on the existence of criminal groups that they termed "death squads," because they are implicated as those responsible for 28,000 killings.

On the morning of Tuesday October 12, 2010, eleven police in Sinaloa were shot while patrolling a road on the outskirts of Culiacán.  Eight were killed and three wounded. The next day, in Chihuahua, the chief custodians of the local prison and five bodyguards were killed minutes after finishing their work shifts.
No authority has linked incidents, however, the only probable connection has come to light for the first time, that one branch of the state has acknowledged what so far the federal government has denied the involvement of paramilitary groups in the drug war.

In September, the Senate formally asked the Center for Investigation and National Security (CISEN) to provide detailed reports on the existence of these groups, which they termed "death squads" because they are indicated as bearing the responsibility for a large percentage of the 28,000 murders officially recognized in this war, as well as thousands of forced disappearances.

"These groups operate outside the law with the complicity, recognition and/or tolerance of the Mexican state," said Ricardo Monreal Avila, coordinator of the Parliamentary Group of the Labor Party, and one of the promoters of the request for the CISEN reports. Considering the fact that these groups are composed of thousands of soldiers and officers who have deserted from the army, as well as many police who have been fired for being corrupt, the senator added that these groups are composed of “well-trained paramilitaries."

A year ago, Mauricio Fernandez, Mayor of San Pedro Garza Garcia, shocked the country when he revealed at his inauguration the murder of Hector Saldaña Perales, a.k.a. “El Negro,” an alleged extortionist and drug dealer who was harassing local entrepreneurs.

The extraordinary thing is that the mayor’s announcement anticipated the official identification of the victim that would be made hours later by the Attorney General in the Federal District where the body was found. In the same speech the mayor announced the formation of a (grupo rudo)  "tough group,”  coordinated by his government to confront high-level criminals such as Saldaña.

According to Monreal Avila, who governed Zacatecas between 1998 and 2004, the episode sums up the reality of the country.

"This mayor is not the only one (to employ paramilitaries). Governors have extermination groups, groups dedicated to “cleansing” that train and select elite teams who act outside the law. Only now, the Senate is recognizing their existence and we are waiting for official information. It would be Kafkaesque if they wereto say that these groups do not exist. ”The growing number of murders, kidnappings and extortion has also led employers to recruit such groups, reiterates Monreal.

The senator claims to have reports that this occurs in industrialized cities in Jalisco, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila and Tamaulipas. What makes the picture even bloodier is that organized crime, or certain segments of organized crime are protected by the authorities. Their reports will be reserved until the release of the federal government's official version comes out, but he did not explain the reason for his decision.

Before the senators went to CISEN for these reports, civil organizations in Baja California, Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Tamaulipas, Michoacán and Guerrero have been documenting paramilitary operations for years.

CHRONOLOGY OF EXTERMINATION

In the early 1990's, the lawyer Miguel Angel García Leyva and other citizens formed in Sinaloa Front Against Impunity. For 10 years, they gathered evidence on the activities of "death squads, causing thousands of kidnappings and killings in the state." These groups were made up of police or military personnel.

"The participation of these squads is known publicly not only in Sinaloa, but throughout the country," he says. "They operate dressed in official uniforms, driving patrol cars, and with weapons, badges and keys just like the forces of the state."

In 2001, Garcia changed his residence to Baja California. There he helped to form the Esperanza Association with the families of disappeared persons. In nine years the group worked on the cases of 8,000 victims, four times more than those acknowledged by the state attorney. All of them, he says, were abducted by paramilitaries.

"In Baja California these extermination squads have been named “Black Commandos” and their presence has been noted especially since mid-2005 to date. And there is evidence to conclude that many of their actions have been to kill people, not just to disappear them. There are political disappearances as well as those of impunity, all of them resulting from this war that is fratricidal and mistaken," said García.
To date, no charge against the organization has been successful in court. The reason, says the lawyer, is corruption. "We cannot just talk about groups of thugs, gunmen, sicarios and drug trafficking activities; these accusations imply the full participation of the state."

To confirm this, he cites an investigation conducted between May 2008 and May 2010 along the highways in northwestern Mexico. They produced video, photographs and written reports on police and military checkpoints in Nayarit, Sinaloa, Sonora and Baja California. "The results astounded us,  most of the checkpoints are not only points of extortion, but places to identify and locate people to disappear, assassinate or commit other acts against them," says Garcia.

BLACK NUMBERS/LAS CIFRAS NEGRAS

There are many extermination operations occurring in these states, but very few come to public light.
He cites another example. In August, a group invaded the town of El Sasabe an ejido near the border in northern Sonora that has become a main illegal crossing point into the United States—and massacred 40 people. "The silence is terrible. No account is given of what actually happens and if it were possible to reveal these “black operations” we would see that there are not 28,000 dead as the government says, but rather, but more than 40,000."

Cases of extermination have also been documented over time in other states such as Chihuahua.
Between November 1995 and February 1996, the State Attorney General received complaints about the disappearances of 375 people. Witnesses of several of these abductions said that they saw subjects involved in the actions who identified themselves as federal police. In one case, the sister of two of the victims, and Armando and Francisco Rayos Jaquez, obtained the registration of one of the vehicles used by the kidnappers. This registration document belonged to the official vehicle assigned to the delegate of the Attorney General’s office at the time, Arturo Chavez Chavez, the same person who is now the Attorney General of the Republic.

The remains of nine of those victims were unearthed in December 1999 on a ranch on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, known as La Campana. Of the rest, no information ever came to light. The Association of Friends and Relatives of the Disappeared has records of 180 of these cases. Only 37 of them ever resulted in a judicial inquiry.

Jaime Hervella, president of that organization, said, "What I can tell you is that according to the statement by the federal prosecutor in charge of the investigation, Enrique Cocina Martinez, state and federal police were involved in each of these cases. I do not know if there are death squads in the city. I do not have evidence to prove that statement. But I can say that now, they do not even bother to abduct them and take them away. Now, they just kill them and throw them into the street."

In 2007, according to data from the State Attorney General, a little more than 300 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez. But between 2008 and so far in 2010, the figure has reached nearly seven thousand homicides. Of that total, more than half was members of street gangs and juvenile offenders, which leaves no doubt according to civil organizations such as the National Front against Repression, that what is going on is something other than a war between drug cartels. What is actually taking place is a "social cleansing."

In Nuevo Laredo and Reynosa, similar practices have been used since the beginning of the decade, said Raymundo Ramos, director of the Center for Human Rights of Nuevo Laredo.

Gang members from both cities became a serious threat to society and the government made use of armed groups to exterminate them, according to reports gathered by Ramos.

"The gangsters attacked police as well as civil society, staged gunfights over territory, raped women, raided schools and universities, robbed businesses and even banks.  Then, when the narco-trafficking rose to a higher level, the first thing they did was to subdue/take over control of the gangs and use them as their informants, couriers and hired killers/sicarios. The drug trafficking organizations have made the street gangs into a disposable criminal network."

What followed was a second round of killings in recent months: "The reports we have are that the majority of criminals killed in clashes or attacks with organized crime groups or against federal authorities are young, kids who have not even reached 20. Here in Nuevo Laredo have at least 15 reports from young people against the military of torture, rape, extrajudicial killing and forced disappearance.”


Corruption and impunity

What is being waged in the country is not a war against organized crime, but extermination, says Mercedes Murillo Monge, president of the Sinaloan Civic Front.

"It is difficult to prove who promotes these death squads. In fact, it is impossible. No one knows because no one investigates. The corruption is huge, the impunity is absolute. What we as a united front can say is that in this so-called war, very many innocent people have been assassinated by the authorities," she said.

What Murillo has found out about the cases in Sinaloa is similar to what other citizens’ organizations have discovered that there is a notable increase in the number of murders and disappearances since the beginning of the government’s anti-crime operations.

In the framework of this "war," said Rosario Ibarra de Piedra, president of the Human Rights Commission of the Senate, "it is mostly “ninis” (the slang term for ‘ni trabajan, ni estudian’ young people who neither work nor go to school and so are susceptible to street gangs) who are being abducted and taken away, that is, these people that the government has deemed expendable. They are people no one wants or needs and so they might as well die. What do we want withthem, especially when they are seen as trouble, as obstacles to the needs and desires of certain elites?”

Ibarra, who for 35 years has denounced the existence of death squads financed by the government, cites two cases to support the theory of social cleansing. First, a massacre in July at the Quinta de Torreón at ,a gay and lesbian party.  Then, the remains of 51 people that were exhumed from a clandestine grave in the Municipality of Juarez, Nuevo León. Those bodies were "all covered with tattoos."

"Right now we cannot venture to say that there is training or tolerance on the part of the Army, or that they have knowledge of such death squads. We have not yet reached the point where we can say that,” says Sen. Ricardo Monreal. But what is certain is that "four years after this began and after four years of justification by the spokesmen of the government and the military hierarchy, what we can certainly say is that this strategy was very wrong.”

 http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/716971.htmlhttp://www.eluniversal...
http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/nacion/181270.html
 
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

†.©ĤİVǾ.†
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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Take a look at my full article on ain board and give me your opinion.  

The article has many elements to it, and if the senators are correct then cartels are also apart of the death squads, and the Murder Tally is almost double......
 
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

adam
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AJ
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

AJ
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I've read and heard many stories from people in Juarez who were abused or knew someone who was killed by the Mexican army. Many of these soldiers (many of them were just teenagers) would raid people's homes and steal their possessions, beat up the men in the house and sometimes rape the women. Many innocent men would be kidnapped from the streets by the army and later killed for no apparent reason. And the government did nothing. I REPEAT, The government did NOTHING. And this is a common occurrence throughout Mexico. It wasn't until the people yelled at Calderon during one of his visits to Juarez, to remove the army from Juarez, that some the killings stopped for a while.

Death Squads are another Beast but it's all the same abuse of an incompetent system. Mexico still has a long way to go in order to exist peacefully. Everyone knows what needs to be done but no one is willing to work for it.

@ Buela

Great job on the report that you just posted on the main board.

CHIVIS FOREVER
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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I wanted to include all the ways that innocents are being killed.  

if one reads carefully, there are hints everywhere and from every element...in the narcos confessions, in the narco mantas, by the authorities, everywhere.  WHat hurts are the families that have come forth and said their story and defended the honor of innocent victims.

it is getting worse and it is something that needs to be widely known...

thats for reading the post
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Baggy
i read this and i thought that was what this was http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2009/04/forum.html     <--- social cleansing @ work?
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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Baggy...

your link did not take me anywhere...  :(
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

ArmChairIntellect
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This is a scary topic buela, most are too scared to talk about it.  
AJ
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

AJ
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Buelita,

You did a great job. I read it twice and you are right. There is a lot of valuable information there. Death squads do exist and it's scary to know that many of them are supposed to be public protectors. And how the politicians are so corrupt and such cowards to lie for these criminals or to manipulate the truth.

Like I said before, It's all 100% bullshit! The stupid senseless narco blankets and banners. The fake politicians. The one-dimensional judicial system. The cowards who call themselves cartel leaders who have others kill innocent people just for the sake of propaganda. How are we supposed to believe anything that comes out of Mexico? And how are we supposed to believe that a cartel captured 49 real narcos? It would be so much easier to capture a few real narcos and to capture and kill many other innocents and just say that they were all bad. Whoever thinks that all of these victims are narcos is just plain stupid.
CHIVIS FOREVER
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Baggy
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My bad chivis, the 9 cold ones here shoulda been in that link, heh im still a forum nub! http://borderland-beat.924382.n3.nabble.com/Graphic-Photos-9-Executed-in-Guerrero-td4015981.html
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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This post was updated on .
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The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

primus421
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Baggy
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Nah nothing concrete its just an assumption. They way they were dumped, with some Invisible narco note? They still had all their body parts so it just made me think with the way things are going that cops could just be grabbing prostitutes,drug users or anyone they dont like and making it appear to be the work of narcos. Just somuch bs. I am always suss when they do not disclose whats being said in the narcomessanje n thought it was a coincidence since we were recently talking on this social cleansing. I mean, Why would you put a note with people out in the middle of fkn nowhere? Things in mexico are VERY STRANGE lately. So again it was just my opinion so dont add these to the list of innocents.
Patriotism is a propaganda tool used to make people blind to the lies of their government through unquestioning devotion.
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

Chivis
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ok!  got it.  well i think that is a good assumption.  often there is not a message left, people are further terrorized by imagining "who" is responsible.

the truth is, in narco plazas, narcos rule the municipalities.  including the newspaper and police.  It is easy to pick up innocents for a kill.  they do not resist, are unarmed and obey authority...lambs to the slaughter.  a kill may be ordered like hamburgers and fries (please no disrepect I am thinking as the killers do)  they may say "we need 20"  and there go people like chato, the order taker, and pick at random.  Or as in Ver, the order was given to the police and they pciked them up in patrol cars.  

people that do not see the benefit are short sighted, it is easy, quick and clean.
 
The way I see it.... the more people that don't like me, the less people I have to please
AJ
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Re: Social Cleansing Not Drugwar

AJ
the truth is, in narco plazas, narcos rule the municipalities.  including the newspaper and police.  It is easy to pick up innocents for a kill.  they do not resist, are unarmed and obey authority...lambs to the slaughter.  a kill may be ordered like hamburgers and fries (please no disrepect I am thinking as the killers do)  they may say "we need 20"  and there go people like chato, the order taker, and pick at random.  Or as in Ver, the order was given to the police and they pciked them up in patrol cars.  

people that do not see the benefit are short sighted, it is easy, quick and clean.



That's what I was trying to say but you said it a thousand times better.
CHIVIS FOREVER